Rhyme and meaning in Richard Crashaw.
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Rhyme and meaning in Richard Crashaw. by Mary Ellen Rickey

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Published by University of Kentucky Press in Lexington .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Crashaw, Richard, -- 1613?-1649

Book details:

The Physical Object
Pagination98 p.
Number of Pages98
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23751440M

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Rhyme and meaning in Richard Crashaw. New York, Haskell House Publishers, [©] (OCoLC) Named Person: Richard Crashaw; Richard Crashaw; Richard Crashaw: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Mary Ellen Rickey. Richard Crashaw's use of rhyme is one of the distinctive aspects of his poetic technique, and in the first systematic analysis of his rhyme craft, Mary Ellen Rickey concludes that he was keenly interested in rhyme as a technical by: 2. Rhyme and Meaning in Richard Crashaw Mary Ellen Rickey Published by The University Press of Kentucky Rickey, Mary Ellen. or of look, whose rhyme counterpart book appears almost exclusively as a rhyme word. Nor is there any good reason for his using dove, nest, and the like preponderantly as rhymes. One must simply con­Cited by: 2. : Rhyme and Meaning in Richard Crashaw (): Mary Ellen Rickey: Books. Skip to main content. Try Prime Books Go Search EN Hello, Sign Cited by: 2.

Richard Crashaw’s use of rhyme is one of the distinctive aspects of his poetic technique, and in the first systematic analysis of his rhyme craft, Mary Ellen Rickey concludes that he was keenly interested in rhyme as a technical device. She traces Crashaw’s development of rhyme repetitions from the simple designs of his early epigrams and secular poems to the elaborate and irregular Cited by: 2. Richard Crashaw's use of rhyme is one of the distinctive aspects of his poetic technique, and in the first systematic analysis of his rhyme craft, Mary Ellen Rickey concludes that he was keenly interested in rhyme as a technical : Mary Ellen Rickey. Product Information. Richard Crashaw's use of rhyme is one of the distinctive aspects of his poetic technique, and in the first systematic analysis of his rhyme craft, Mary Ellen Rickey concludes that he was keenly interested in rhyme as a technical device. Poems by Richard Crashaw. The son of a violently anti-Catholic deacon, Richard Crashaw was born in London in He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Pembroke College at Cambridge in , and the following year.

The Flaming Heart or the Life of the Glorious S. Teresa. by Richard Crashaw Original Language English. The flaming Heart. Upon the booke and picture of Teresa. As she is usually expressed with a Seraphim beside her Well meaning Readers! you that come as Friends, And catch the pretious name this piece pretends, Make not so much hast to admire. I have at last the pleasure of seeing half-fulfilled a long-cherished wish and intention, by the issue of the present Volume, being Vol. I. of the first really worthy edition of the complete Poetry of Richard Crashaw, while Vol. II. is so well advanced that it may be counted on for Midsummer (Deo favente).. This Volume contains the whole of the previously-published English Poems, with the. By Richard Crashaw (?–) Vpon the book and Picture of the seraphicall saint Teresa, (as she is vsvally expressed with a Seraphim biside her) WELL meaning readers! you that come as freinds: And catch the pretious name this peice pretends; Make not too much hast to’ admire. Mary Ellen Rickey, through a close examination of Herbert’s poetry, reveals the high concentration of ideas in his verse and the richness of his imagery. Mary Ellen Rickey is an associate professor of English at the University of Kentucky. She is author of Rhyme and Meaning in Richard by: